Why you must not use Singapore Hobby for any DJI repairs.

Rant/ Complain post. Scroll all the way down for TLDR version.

4 April – Logged case to DJI
5 April – DJI revert to contact Singapore Hobby
19 April 2018 – We send in the Mavic Pro to Singapore Hobby and got a qutation on 19 April.

Repair cost $593.60 paid to via paypal sales@singahobby.com Replacement/Repair :
Damping Board:$20
Back Right Leg $101
Front Right Leg $110
Back left leg:$101
Top shell $14.30
middle shell $28.70
front sensor $138.60
Camera Ribbon:$80.00
$120 labour charges

27 April 2018 – Told Singapore hobby to cancel after they told us that have to collect $150 AFTER the repair. The upfront $150 is for “diagnostics and evaluation” only. WTF?!
28 April 2018 – Singapore Hobby called that the $150 AFTER repair is wrong. Will not be collected. Inform them to go ahead….#BMOML – biggest mistake of my life.
29 April 2018 – Car Free Sunday, Singapore Hobby was involved. If too busy shouldn’t accept our mavic for repairs!
8 May 2018 – Asked for update
9 May 2018 – Replied, still repairing…end of the week should be done. To wait.
21 May 2018 – Ask for update again…no reply.
23 May 2018 – Ask for update to the previous update if any.
25 May 2018 – Singapore Hobby replied informing high voloume of repairs.
31 May 2018 – Ask for update again, got a reply that it is ready for collection soon as they are doing test flight. ***Note they mention they did test flight.***
1 June 2018 – The repair completed.. That’s 6 weeks.
6 June 2018 – Collected from Singapore Hobby. When we receive it, the transmitter has no sound and the Mavic Pro has a forward right sensor error. Emailed immedaitely to Singapore Hobby with screenshots.
12 June 2018. – send it back
21 June 2018 – Send a chaser email on and giving up hope that i’ll be getting it back anytime soon.
25 June 2018 – Took the initial request to DJI and continue the original request requesting them to look into their Singapore partner, Singapore Hobby. It’s really bad and DJI took over.
3 July 2018 – Singahobby send the mavic pro to DJI, below screenshot shows it is showing up. Case logged and accepted as CAS-1972819-N6Q2S0

10 July 2018 – Received at DJI, same day quoted. Quote sent to Singapore Hobby. oh god…more waiting.

13 July 2018 – Asked DJI why quote delayed for 3 days and still not paid.
14 July 2018 – DJI replied “We hope that your dealer can provide the latest update of the repair case as they are in contact of our facility with this.” My dealer is useless…I can only lan lan siao siao wait.
16 July 2018 – Singapore Hobby sent a quotation on the repair charges. This is DJI quoted plus maybe or maybe not, their markup. Funny how DJI still found things to repair after Singapore Hobby has “repaired” it? Shouldn’t their repair certification be revoked? Replied them the same, that if there’s still things to repair, what did you do? I paid you for?

18 July 2018 – Emailed DJI on update.
19 July 2018 – Singapore Hobby reply that they need to inform me the charges BEFORE DJI can proceed with repair. Whatever that means. Replied asking if DJI is proceeding or not.
19 July 2018 – James Russell from DJI revert with a copy and paste reply “We regret to inform you that we are not able to provide more details regarding the case you checked. Because it was reported by the dealer.

We only can provide case information to the original reporter in consideration of safety and privacy protection.”

…send the whole above to DJI repeating the whole case form beginning till now ALL OVER AGAIN. Case original reported was ME and me all along. Wtf are you talking about?! CAS-1972819-N6Q2S0 is the new case ID, it is tied to Singapore Hobby because they send it to you! Your system has tied it to them, while we paid them, they didnt fix, DJI takes over and I’m still screwed.

23 July 2018 – Ronald Yong from Singapore Hobby replied to DJI’s logged case that he happen to be in DJI China as well, for training. Asked to meet up with the support James from DJI to resolve this.

25 July 2018 – Replied Singapore Hobby to sort it out with DJI.

26 July 2018 – Nothing is done, no update. Open a case with Paypal trying to get back the original money paid on 19 April 2018.

30 July 2018 – Singapore replied PayPal resolution saying the repair is for…(we direct quote) transmitter only! So the quoted $310.30 is for repairing the transmitter? Then why did they send the whole mavic pro back? Or did they send the whole mavic back since one of the front vision sensor has error.

1 Aug 2018 – Singapore Hobby replied the 25 July email that he “may” be able to check with his manager on the status. Well done, 1 week read 1 email and ok, you slowly may check…we have given up anyway.

3 Aug 2018 – Ronald from Singapore Hobby replied in Paypal Resolution Centre. We called and spoke to him and agree to pay 50% of the 2nd quote of $105.15, well, since we do not ask for a on the spot demo, we see how it may seem that we took it out the shop, to be fair, anything could have happened to it. It’s been 4 months to the day, we just want this over and done with Singapore Hobby.

6 Aug 2018 – Payment received by DJI and repair in progress. Another few days wasted.

13 Aug 2018 – Repaired and was returned to Singapore Hobby today. We waited.

17 Aug 2018 – No fucking response as usual. Send chaser email and waited again. Slow response. Receive but can’t call or email to tell me after all the big fucking hoo-ha with them. This should have been put on piority. That’s the way bussiness is done at Singapore Hobby. Fucked-UP!

20 Aug 2018 – Received call from Singapore Hobby. Meet tomorrow 12.30pm Hong Lim Park to test.

21 Aug 2018 – Met, Tested. Collected. Left.

Dji took only 8 days once payment is received. If not for wasting a few months at Singapore Hobby. We won’t be tangled in this garbage.

Comparing a similar case we log concurrently with DJI.

Smiliar case we log ( CAS-1830023-xxxx)

23 May 2018 – case logged via email.
24 May 2018 – Case accepted with case log number received from DJI Nicole.
7 June 2018 – DJI Received with email acknowledgement.
28 June 2018 – Delay by us on sending out due to newborn at home. Sent via SF Express
29 June 2018 – At DJI
7 June 2018 – Quotation for repaired received,
8 June 2018 – Payment made.
13 June 2018 – Informed it is repaired and on the way back
15 June 2018 – Informed by Roly Fang that there is a slight delay due to updating of shipping system and the Dragon Boat Festival.
22 June 2018 – Received the DJI Mavic Pro.

The above is delayed and yet it is still faster than what we have sent to Singapore Hobby!

Their contacts, they have some other domain names but if you see this address and contact, be afraid…be very afraid:

150 South Bridge Road
#B1-23 Fook Hai Building
Singapore 058727

Opening hours:
10:30am to 7:00pm Mondays to Fridays
10:30am to 6:00pm Saturdays
CLOSED on Sundays and Public Holidays

Call us at (65) 6532 1993
Email us at sales@singahobby.com
Fax us at (65) 6535 7866
DJI themselves are a mess. When you log a case, whenever you spread out your response and then carry on the replies, it’s as if it’s a brand new case. Having to repeat and their standard reply “We understand your frustration and hope to resolved it.” Oh stupid. Solve it already! Then we go round and round all over again! Paypal resolution is the fastest and easiest way to make vendors wake up since behind the scene, I believe it will cause issues on payment and receiving of funds. They will surely reply.
We need alternatives in Singapore. Old school hobby shops need to die.

TLDR version

TLDR – Singapore Hobby took 2 months to repair our mavic pro. Complained to dji who took over the case. Don’t use Singapore hobby. Go direct to DJI.

Lithium based batteries on planes

Created 2 March 2016
Reviewed – 28 Dec 2017
Updated 2 Feb 2018

In what was problem that was actually caused by the manufacturers, passengers are actually penalised on how much watt hours worth of batteries you can hand carry on board planes.

Watt hours is what airlines uses. We are lucky there’s the Internet. It’s actually not much, for example, we use the popular 5200mAh and 5000mAh 4S lipos.

Converted, they are 76.96 and 74 watt hour respectively.

Convert using this or use

(mAh)*(V)/1000 = (Wh)

Other popular batteries (values are per battery) –

DJI Mavic – 43.66 Wh
DJI Phantom 3 – 68 Wh
DJI Phantom 4 – 81.3 Wh
DJI Inspire 1 – 129 Wh

***Do Not Check in Any Batteries in luggage. Always hand carry.***

Singapore – Cargo shipments of lithium-ion batteries will be banned from passenger aircraft from April 1 to reduce the risk of onboard fires.

Gist of it:

index

Jetstar Asia – carry on only, two lithium-ion batteries under 101 (6824.32 mAh 4S Lipo) watt-hours each that are part of electronic equipment.

– Only one other spare battery under 101 watt-hours may be carried on board,

  • There are no restrictions for batteries under 101Wh (eg found in mobile phones, laptops)
  • All spare batteries must travel as carry-on baggage.
  • Batteries in checked baggage must have the ON/OFF switch protected to prevent accidental activation.
  • Batteries between 101Wh and 160Wh (eg in medical equipment) require airline approval, which you can request by emailing dg@qantas.com.au.
  • Any batteries over 160Wh must be sent by Qantas Freight (except motorised mobility aids, see below).

(Source)

taindex

Tigerair – board personal devices with a capacity of up to 160 watt-hours (10810.81 mAh 4S Lipo).
(Source)

unnamed

Singapore Airlines allows laptops and mobile phones with less than 100 watt-hours (6756.75 mAh 4S Lipo) and a lithium content of less than 2g as onboard items.

But the move will not apply to personal devices that are carried on board, the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) said yesterday.

The United Nations aviation agency’s precautionary step comes after years of industry concerns that lithium-ion batteries could fuel undetected fires in the cargo hold of planes.

Most airlines now do not allow passengers to check in lithium-ion batteries unless they are contained within personal devices such as laptop computers and mobile phones.

While there have been no serious incidents so far, lithium battery-powered equipment is suspected to have caused a fire in an empty aircraft parked at London’s Heathrow Airport in 2013.

A spokesman for the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) said ICAO’s latest restriction will be conveyed to airlines and other relevant industry players.

“Currently, passengers are permitted to carry portable electronic devices containing lithium batteries in checked-in or carry-on bags,” she said.

“However, spare batteries, including power banks, are not permitted to be carried in check-in bags. They are permitted in hand- carry bags only.”

Singapore carriers also have their own guidelines, on top of what is now required by the regulator.

On Jetstar Asia flights, those who wish to carry the items onboard are allowed two lithium-ion batteries under 101 watt-hours each that are part of electronic equipment.

Only one other spare battery under 101 watt-hours may be carried on board, said a spokesman.

On Tigerair, passengers may carry on board personal devices with a capacity of up to 160 watt-hours.

Singapore Airlines allows laptops and mobile phones with less than 100 watt-hours and a lithium content of less than 2g as onboard items. A mobile phone typically uses a battery that is less than 10 watt-hours.

CAAS conducts regular audits and inspections to ensure guidelines are adhered to, said a spokesman.

ICAO president Olumuyiwa Benard Aliu said: “Safety is always our most fundamental priority in international civil aviation.”

The prohibition, coming after extensive reviews, is an interim measure until a new lithium battery packaging performance standard is introduced, possibly by 2018, he said.

The latest move has been eagerly awaited by aircraft manufacturer and pilots associations, which have been the most vocal advocates for the new safety measure, he said.

160Wh per battery. You are permitted 2 pieces. Total 320Wh. (That’s 8 x Mavic batteries per passenger.)

“Maximum of two spare batteries in carry-on baggage only”

(Source)

Smart baggage are allowed as checked baggage provided it meets the following requirement:
  • The battery must be removed
  • The battery must be kept in a protective pouch
  • WH (Watt Hour) of the battery must not exceed 160Wh
  • Ensure the Wifi/Bluetooth/GPS is switched off
  • A maximum of 2 spare batteries in the cabin baggage is allowed*
    160Wh per battery. You are permitted 2 pieces. Total 320Wh. (That’s 8 x Mavic batteries OR 4 x Phantom 4 batteries per passenger.)

(Source)

Cathay

160Wh

(Source)